VPC’s Application: Street Use Permits/Noise

18 Jan

The Administrative Conditional Use application requires VPC to demonstrate that noise emanating from sidewalk seating for the proposed use would be no more than that from the previous legal use (in this case, a mom-and-pop grocery).

  • Any business at 1501 is fully accountable for all noise it generates, regardless of whether it operates under ‘nonconforming use: grocery’ or ‘nonconforming use: an eating and drinking establishment.’

In its application, VPC omits any measurement of the interior noise levels, which are certainly far louder than those of a neighborhood grocery.

  • Groceries of this size would rarely have more than a handful of patrons at one time. It is hard to imagine all of them  be engaged in conversations at the same time.
  • Based on full capacity use of the interior seating configuration during a typical Wine Dinner, there are likely to be 15 to 20 conversations in progress (including employees); plus sounds of glasses, plates, etc.
  • When VPC’s inadequate ventilation causes staff to open the front window above the entrance, some neighbors receive a barrage of dining noise. The level can be quite disturbing throughout warm months.

The below information is posted not to further hammer VPC. We post it to underline our objection to their proposed expansion.

Illegal sidewalk service is common; in fact, is one of VPC's key attributes

 

Until late into 2010,VPC operated sidewalk service without any permits from  Seattle Department of Transportation (SDOT).

After obtaining permits, VPC operated outside limitations laid out by their permits.

  • Taking orders and serving food: not allowed under their current sidewalk permit (14 B).
  • Allowing alcohol: no alcohol at all is allowed on the patio, not even if customers carry it out themselves (as they are allowed to do with food).
  • Seating: VPC improperly stuffed 16 chairs and 8 tables onto the 17th Avenue E. frontage.
  • We have correspondence in which SDOT acknowledges that the permit for 17th allows half that amount.

Drinking alcohol on sidewalk also common; also illegal

 

After 10pm, neighbors often have to suffer with the noise made by the departure of loud, often tipsy dinner patrons.

  • VPC’s well-attend “Wine Dinner” nights can be particularly loud, and run particularly late.
  • The Sept. 10, 2010, “Charles Smith Wine Dinner” packed the house and ended at 11:30 p.m.
  • VPC’s Facebook page boasts the consumption of 72 bottles of wine.

Given VPC’S poor record of mitigating their impacts, we do not expect that fewer impacts will result from operating a larger restaurant.

This post continues a series of posts analyzing VPC’s application to change their land-use to legalize the operation of their restaurant.

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