Tag Archives: safety

VPC’s Application: Commercial Delivery & Parking

13 Jan

This post continues a series of posts analyzing VPC’s application to change their land-use to legalize the operation of their restaurant.

VPC’s Administrative Conditional Use application states:

In order to address the potential parking and traffic impacts of commercial deliveries for both the existing and proposed use, the Volunteer Park Café and Marketplace has made a request to SDOT that a 30 minute (sic) load unload zone be placed in adjacent to the restaurant.

Once a solution is identified, Volunteer Park Café and Marketplace will share it with neighborhood representatives to make sure they prefer the proposed solution to the current situation.

Currently, VPC has put no resolution into effect. Furthermore, all other feasible locations for the proposed 30-minute zone would simply move the traffic disruption to that area.

Illegal delivery parking creates hazard. (Sept., 2010)

 

Commercial delivery vehicles park on the planting strip on Galer, immediately west of the 17th & Galer intersection:

  • blocking the sight triangle at 17th and Galer by parking;
  • blocking the view up Galer to the west. (This condition is compounded by pedestrians crossing to/from the VPC as well as pedestrian and automobile traffic due to Stevens Elementary School just one block east.)

Galer delivery: identical parking, luckily no school bus

The intensity of the impact, quantified by the number of daily deliveries, has increased from that of the grocery store.

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VPC’s Application: Building Permit Compliance

28 Dec

This post continues a series of posts analyzing VPC’s application to change their land-use to legalize the operation of their restaurant.

VPC’s “Improving neighbor relations” page states:

“From day one, our commercial kitchen was inspected and approved by the city to meet all regulations, including exhaust. As part of the current permit process with the Department of Planning and Development, we will again work with the city to ensure we meet all regulations for cooking exhaust.”

VPC passed the inspection by the Seattle-King County Health Department. There is no evidence of VPC having filed for or received Building Permit Compliance to allow construction of the kitchen, the exhaust system, or other related components. Separate City department oversee health inspections and building code compliance.

Both are critical. They are not interchangeable.

Any change in land-use comes with a retroactive compliance. VPC’s request is no exception. This stipulation is posted on the Notice of Proposed Land-Use Action (photo) that The Department of Planning and Development (DPD) placed on VPC’s fences during the public comment period.

The City takes seriously the life safety impacts associated with a restaurant occupancy, as seen in:

  • building code provisions that use fire-rated construction, barriers; and
  • additional measures to reduce risk to firefighters and adjacent properties.

With an apartment above and close proximity to single-family residences, VPC’s restaurant creates a significant risk that was not present prior to the creation of a commercial kitchen in the 100-year-old wood frame structure.

Click here to read additional critique of VPC’s application.

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Updated 3/5/11.

Parking impact

10 Oct

View from neighbor's driveway.

Cafe customer completely blocks a neighbor’s driveway.

We are shocked that we were able to take this photo during the public comment period resulting from VPC’s request for a land-use change. The land-use change process asks VPC to demonstrate that their business would cause no more impact than the previous legal use of the space: a grocery store.

If VPC cannot try to reduce their parking impact during the public comment period, we have no reason to believe that that would make any attempt during a standard business operations.

Neighbors, VPC meet for second time.

12 Sep

This evening, a group of neighbors met at VPC with the cafe owners, one cafe employee, and Roque (pronounced: “Rocky”) Deherrera, from the Office of Economic Development at the City of Seattle. It was 4 days before their deadline for submitting the application to legalize their restaurant.

Neighbors were hoping VPC owners would demonstrate a serious effort to rebuild the trust they lost during the months they defamed their next-door neighbor and ignored concerns of others

At the meeting, we covered the following points:

  • The cafe intend to submit for conditional use application on September 17th.
  • They plan to include the current restaurant area and the small office upstairs and the basement (for storage) in their submittal.
  • They don’t plan to pursue permission to use the backyard for outdoor activity.
  • They intend to continue to use the sidewalk.
  • They stated that the building owner is on board with their plans.
  • They volunteered that they are not going to apply for a hard liquor license.

Responding to specifics from our letter:

Garbage: they say they have increased pickup to 3 per week, which the neighbors maintain is not adequate.

  • The cafe plans to construct a garbage enclosure, and offered to dump all bottles before 8 pm.
  • They listed Terminix as their contractor for pest control.

Odors: discussed non-compliance of their current exhaust fan and the odors wafting into neighbors’ yards.

  • Cafe asked if neighbors would be supportive of barbequing in the backyard for occasional events.
  • Neighbors said, “No.”

Noise: neighbors clarified concerns about reflected noise and noise at clean-up; reiterated that they would not support sidewalk seating of any sort.

Traffic: cafe acknowledged issues with deliveries.

  • Said that, three weeks prior, began working with SDOT discussing a 30 minute Load Zone (which may be located on the south side of Galer).
  • Discussed Galer, Auburn, Garfield, and 17th and possible mitigation efforts that could be initiated by SDOT.
  • Discussed VPC policing illegal parking in their immediate vicinity.

Covenant: VPC didn’t feel a covenant was necessary, that landuse permit would address the issues. Neighbors disagreed.

Timing: cafe agreed to respond to our letter in one week, which might be a copy of their application


The meeting ended with the neighbors suggesting that more frequent and regular meetings occur between the neighborhood and VPC. Neighbors suggested quarterly meetings.

In summary, the primary disagreements appear to be 1) sidewalk seating and 2) the covenant. The cafe owners appeared willing to work with the neighbors on the remaining issues.

CHS: “Neighbors have plenty to say about Volunteer Park Cafe.”

31 Aug

As a companion piece to his earlier article, editor “jseattle” at CHS (aka: The Capitol Hill blog) wrote the first news piece showing the conflict from other than VPC’s perspective:

Unlike two other news outlets in the city covering this story, we haven’t mentioned his name on CHS until now. Here’s why. The man who made the original complaint to the Department of Planning and Development about Volunteer Park Cafe’s land-use issues wasn’t the only neighbor to complain to the City of Seattle, a group forming to represent neighbors in the area says.

According to the group, the situation at 17th Ave and Galer isn’t Paul Jones vs. Volunteer Park Cafe. It’s a growing group of residents who live nearby and have concerns about the scale the popular restaurant is trying to achieve …

Jones said he took his concerns up with the cafe in February and was informed that the owners had been advised by a lawyer that their use of the space was legitimate. Jones said he knew better and filed the complaint with DPD in May.

Jones also tells CHS that he didn’t intend to be part of the story. “You’re the first people I’ve talked to,” Jones said. “When I made the complaint, the city said my name would be confidential. ‘We highly recommend you not communicate with the owner and that you allow the city to handle this,’ they said.”

When CHS asked DPD staff to provide names of neighbors who had complained in the situation, we were told the names of complainants were confidential.

You can read the full article here.

Double-whammy parking impact.

16 Aug

12:30pm at corner of 17th and Galer.

Two parking impacts at once: delivery truck blocks “Stop” sign and red zone, while across the street in the shade, two cars block the fire hydrant.

The two parked cars belong to VPC owners Ericka Burke and Heather Earnhardt.

Note all the available legal parking.

Parking impact: truck delivery.

14 May

Is parking so congested on 17th Ave E. as well as Galer, that truck parks in the red zone? Or is it just closer to the door?

Did VPC owners ask the truck to re-park legally? Or is there no space on 17th, Galer, or in the alley behind VPC for a truck to legally park for delivery?